The Mighty Cinquain

The Poet, Adelaide Crapsey, is best remembered for creating the cinquain. Crapsey (perhaps unfortunately named) was heavily inspired by the Japanese forms of poetry: haiku and tanka.

Much like the haiku, cinquains usually contain vivid imagery and are used to convey a certain emotion to the reader.

In 1915, Crapsey published a collection of poems called Verse. The book contained twenty-eight Cinquains, some of which are considered some of Adelaide Crapsey’s best work. If you want to see those, here’s a link for ya!

The cinquain has a relatively simple structure which, much like a haiku, relies on a number of syllables and lines.

Continue reading “The Mighty Cinquain”

Captivity

It’s been a busy week. Therefore, I haven’t been able to write a blog post with which I was happy enough to put out today.

But do not despair!

I thought it would be nice to share a little fifty-word story of mine that was featured on Fiftywordstories.com a little while back. I wrote it for this blog when I was just starting out and didn’t have much of a following.

I hope you enjoy it.

Continue reading “Captivity”

Thank You, Mum

A day, almost certainly, doesn’t cut it.

Mother’s day has long been associated with cards, flowers, and the general giving of gifts to a maternal figure, but it is about so much more than that. It is a celebration of a lifetime devoted to a child, a celebration of unconditional love, and a celebration of the influence of mothers in society.

I’m lucky to have a mum like mine — a great woman who I can thank for so many things. She has instilled in me a love of reading and writing that has become central to who I am; supported me through my every endeavour; and because she believes in me, I can believe in myself.

I can write all the poems, all the stories, and the speeches in the world, but it’ll be a drop in the ocean of all the things my mum has done for me.

Happy Mother’s Day, Mum. Here is a poem dedicated to you.


 

Continue reading “Thank You, Mum”

The Queen of the Tearling: A Review

The Queen of the Tearling is the debut novel, and the first book in a trilogy, by American Author Erika Johansen. Johansen grew up in the San Fransisco area and achieved a MFA from the Iowa’ Writer’s workshop.

Erika Johansen is a fascinating author, with an interesting – and quite public – stance on having more ‘ugly’ heroines in book series. This is certainly reinforced in The Queen of the Tearling with constant references to how ‘plain’ and ‘ugly’ the main character is. In fact, Johansen touches upon a great many meritorious subjects during this novel. But it is for these very same reasons that I’ve come away from this novel quite disappointed.

I hate to give a bad review, especially when everything seems to point at the book actually being good. Johansen secured a seven-figure book and movie deal before the first novel even hit the shelves, the book has sold oodles of copies, and it has drawn comparisons to Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games, both widely regarded as fantastic series.

And that’s a problem! Continue reading “The Queen of the Tearling: A Review”

Versimilitude in Chatoyant Petrichor: Wednesday Wordage

No matter how many of these posts I do, there never seems to be an end to the words I discover. I’m beginning to wonder if the English language is infinite! Well, in some ways I suppose it is. With new words being added to the dictionary all the time, the only language-limiting factor seems to be time. While some of the more recent additions don’t particularly fit into the theme of Wednesday Wordage – twerk and selfie being the pertinent examples – I’m sure that more incredibly, needlessly, horrifically complicated words are on their way.

In fact, the first word on this list is incredibly, needlessly, horrifically complicated. Not to mention that it focuses on a very specific definition (of course), but isn’t that what we’re here for?

Continue reading “Versimilitude in Chatoyant Petrichor: Wednesday Wordage”