1000 Followers!

This is unprecedented, unreal, unbelievable! To have reached 1000 followers on this blog of mine is truly humbling. If you had said to me, when I started uploading my ramblings, that I’d have reached a hundred followers I would have laughed. After that, I would’ve continued to face-plant my keyboard in the never ending search for inspiration.

But here we are, and I’m incredibly thankful for it. When I started writing this blog, I didn’t have a clear idea of what I actually wanted to do with it. It has certainly evolved from the haiku, clunky prose, and sparse verse of my past. The truth is the more I write on here, the more comfortable I become as both a blogger and a writer. It’s a lovely feeling, and as a community, you’ve all been wonderful to me – thank you.

*Gives you all an internet high-five*

That being said, I still have a long way to go! The good news? I have plans (muahaha) *rubs hands in anticipation*.  So yes, this blog post is a little bit more than a quick thank you, I have some stuff to announce.

Continue reading “1000 Followers!”

Railsea: A Review

Look at the acknowledgments at the end of the book & you’ll see just how wide a base of influences this work of art has drawn from. The influence from Herman Melville is the most prominent of the lengthy list of writers Miéville has acknowledged, being another author who wrote a book about a great white beast, a hunter’s obsession, & a life at sea.

But this is no ordinary sea. Railsea is, quite literally, a sea of rails.  A great, sprawling expanse of train tracks that criss-cross, weave, & spread out in a tangle of wood & iron. On these rails (you guessed it) are trains of all varieties. Salvage hunters searching for the shiny detritus of a world long gone, an armada of sail-powered wooden trains, & mole-trains which bristle with hunters & their harpoons.

Continue reading “Railsea: A Review”

The Mighty Cinquain

The Poet, Adelaide Crapsey, is best remembered for creating the cinquain. Crapsey (perhaps unfortunately named) was heavily inspired by the Japanese forms of poetry: haiku and tanka.

Much like the haiku, cinquains usually contain vivid imagery and are used to convey a certain emotion to the reader.

In 1915, Crapsey published a collection of poems called Verse. The book contained twenty-eight Cinquains, some of which are considered some of Adelaide Crapsey’s best work. If you want to see those, here’s a link for ya!

The cinquain has a relatively simple structure which, much like a haiku, relies on a number of syllables and lines.

Continue reading “The Mighty Cinquain”

Captivity

It’s been a busy week. Therefore, I haven’t been able to write a blog post with which I was happy enough to put out today.

But do not despair!

I thought it would be nice to share a little fifty-word story of mine that was featured on Fiftywordstories.com a little while back. I wrote it for this blog when I was just starting out and didn’t have much of a following.

I hope you enjoy it.

Continue reading “Captivity”

Thank You, Mum

A day, almost certainly, doesn’t cut it.

Mother’s day has long been associated with cards, flowers, and the general giving of gifts to a maternal figure, but it is about so much more than that. It is a celebration of a lifetime devoted to a child, a celebration of unconditional love, and a celebration of the influence of mothers in society.

I’m lucky to have a mum like mine — a great woman who I can thank for so many things. She has instilled in me a love of reading and writing that has become central to who I am; supported me through my every endeavour; and because she believes in me, I can believe in myself.

I can write all the poems, all the stories, and the speeches in the world, but it’ll be a drop in the ocean of all the things my mum has done for me.

Happy Mother’s Day, Mum. Here is a poem dedicated to you.


 

Continue reading “Thank You, Mum”